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Hot Yoga May Lead to Muscle and Joint Injuries, TC's Carol Ewing Garber Says

Carol Ewing Garber, Professor of Movement Sciences
Carol Ewing Garber, Professor of Movement Sciences
Hot yoga, performed at a room temperature of 80 to 110 degrees, may lead to more muscle and joint injuries than regular yoga, TC's Carol Ewing Garber, professor of movement science in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences and past president of the American College of Sports Medicine, tells the New York Times's "Well" blog. While data on injuries is limited, the heat makes people feel more limber than they are, which may lead to overdoing it, Ewing Garber says. A link to the story is here.

Published Monday, Dec. 19, 2016

Carol Ewing Garber, Professor of Movement Sciences
Carol Ewing Garber, Professor of Movement Sciences
Hot yoga, performed at a room temperature of 80 to 110 degrees, may lead to more muscle and joint injuries than regular yoga, TC's Carol Ewing Garber, professor of movement science in the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences and past president of the American College of Sports Medicine, tells the New York Times's "Well" blog. While data on injuries is limited, the heat makes people feel more limber than they are, which may lead to overdoing it, Ewing Garber says. A link to the story is here.

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